Tag Archives: Review

Chained

chainedI don’t review films very often. I watch so  many I’d do nothing else if I were to write a review for each of them. But I liked Jennifer Lynch’s latest feature so much I felt compelled to make comment. Chained is quite possibly the best film I’ve seen so far this year. I’m a big fan of Vincent D’Onofrio and this is him at his best. It’s like watching Private Pile’s resurrected brother taking his rifle (knife) out for some fun. There’s menace in those eyes and the way he holds his shoulder that permeates to the form of the words that come from his mouth. Every sinew of his on screen being sweats threat. D’Onofrio reminds me a little of the late Chris Penn. And a little like Mr Penn, if he lost a little weight the cinema going majority might realise that he is actually Robert DeNiro in his prime. Eamon Farren is emotionally engaging as the victimised Rabbit who despite all that is thrown at him desperately clings to a overwhelmed humanity. A huge chunk of the credit for the films success has to go to Ms Lynch, who true to her pedigree keeps you engaged to the end. Just when you think you have the measure of the story, the characters, where it’s all going, she takes a skull cracking left turn that’s as shocking as it is poignant.

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Embarrassed by The Apprentice

If capitalism were a brand? What kind of brand message is THE APPRENTICE sending? I didn’t sit down and watch last nights episode. It was already on when I got in. And stayed on in the background while I busied myself with other things. In that half aware. Peripheral vision. Wallpaper kind of state. I was struck by how juvenile it all is. I realise this is a television programme. And these people are there as much for entertainment as anything else. But if these are the brightest and the best. Lord Sugar’s business is in trouble. They go about their task like a blind man in a patch of brambles. Snaggering here. Tripping there. Because as far as I can tell. They’re so busy trying to elbow their way to the front of the line. They don’t see the others in their team as anything but competition. The worst of it comes when they get to the boardroom. Where the team with slightly better result is rewarded with a trip to a peep show circus. And the others. The ones who did that bit worse. Get to play the greasy spoon blame game. The post task autopsy is like watching a child caught pinching a sibling. They shift the blame. And obfuscate. While holding their knees together. Hoping they will be believed. If they are. It’s off to slime another day. If not. They’re on their bike. Doomed to poverty. And the arbitrary nature of the labour market. If I were the brand manager of capitalism? I’d be embarrassed by The Apprentice. And what it says about my product.

The Social Network

thesocialnetworkTHE SOCIAL NETWORK has to be one of the best films of the year. David Fincher is back on form following the ever so slightly melancholic chore that was Benjamin Button. His direction is subtle. Even masterful. Wise enough to simply get out of the way. And let Aaron Sorkin’s writing shine. From the opening scene. Sorkin draws us in. Leads us through what. In a lesser writer’s hands. Might end up looking like a childish squabble. If you don’t know. The Social Network is about the creation of Facebook. And the ensuing fallout thereof. How much of what we see is true is anyone’s guess. But Sorkin doesn’t let the truth get in the way of a good story. Allowing the various parties to have their say. Even if it contradicts what is being said elsewhere. He lets you make up your own mind. Decide for yourself who is lying. And who is telling the truth. In doing so he manages to make you engage with some of the most unlikeable people you’re ever likely come across. They are elitist self-centred egomaniacs. Their narcissism verges on the psychopathic. Sorkin even manages to make you feel for them. When the depositions are over. And the lawyers have retired to thrash out the settlement. Zuckerberg retreats into his virtual world. And check out his ex’s status on Facebook. It’s hard not to feel something for him at this point. All of his “motivated” behaviour. And all he wants. Is to be liked by a girl. Either that. Or he is dangerous psychopath stalking an ex. You decide. Interesting. Engaging. And definitely worth seeing more than once.

Director: David Fincher
Writer: Aaron Sorkin
Production Year: 2010
Rating: 12A
Running Time: 121 minutes

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